Time Cockpit Blog

Time cockpit allows you to take notes during your daily work. Such a note often acts as a reminder for a certain action, task switch or event that is not automatically tracked but important for your time booking. Notes are typically created for the current point in time. This article shows how you can configure time cockpit to allow arbitrary timestamps in user notes.

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Recently, Microsoft launched their hosted Team Foundation Service which includes the ability to use customized workflows including custom code activities. Last week, I gave the feature a spin and here’s a few things that I tripped over.

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Today one of our customers reported an issue that time cockpit's Silverlight client would not load on his computer. The fabulous thing about this: The customer solved the problem himself AND gave us the root of the cause. We definitely have the best customers in the world.

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From the very first day of our time cockpit project we wanted to support knowledge workers who travel a lot. Finally this vision has become reality. The latest time cockpit version makes booking your time sheet records for business travels a piece of cake.

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If you are using Team Foundation Server for your daily development and planning work time cockpit can provide you with some information from TFS via the signal trackers (e.g. checked in code). Using python scripting and the TFS client SDK you can also query the work items for your projects and store them as time cockpit tasks. This will allow you keep track of your working time based on TFS projects and work items.

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In the newest version of time cockpit we introduce a new signal type for locations. For that we use data collected by the Google Latitude location service.

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In the first entry discussing C++ inheritance, I covered how basic inheritance works: A hidden pointer to a virtual function pointer table is used to dispatch to the correct method. I pointed out that the addresses of the objects, no matter how I casted them around stayed the same. Now this was pretty straightforward for single inheritance, but you will see why this becomes quite special with multiple inheritance.

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On May 17th I did a workshop on parallel programming at parallel 2013 conference in Karlsruhe. The attendees asked me to publish some of the live coding samples I did. In this blog you can find the samples.

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Quite a while ago - still working with Rarebyte - I was designing a class library for game related stuff. Naively ensured that OOP was the only real solution to scaling software, we did a lot of (multiple) inheritance and packed stuff into the library, most of what we never needed anyhow. At one point the question came up on how this was implemented and if we actually knew what this (multiple inheritance especially) meant to the data structures. With self-competence I garbled something about function pointers and tables and a hidden pointer in every object etc. What it meant exactly, I didn't know.

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This year at dotnet Cologne I have proposed a 60 minutes live-coding talk about async/await. It was really accepted and I even got the large ballroom. Wow, live coding in front more than 100 developers. This will be awesome. In this blog I post the sample that I am going to develop on stage.

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